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Scented Houseplants For Your Home


During the winter months, everything can seem so closed in and stuffy. Do you find yourself missing the fresh air? Well, until Spring arrives, we suggest some living potpourri: scented houseplants! Which ones should you choose?


scented houseplants


Year-Round Scented Houseplants


Many plants emit their sweetest aroma while they’re in bloom, which almost always happens during the Spring-Summer. However, some plants smell good year-round, so you can still enjoy their freshness during the Fall-Winter months. Are you looking for examples?


Lavender

Both the foliage and the flowers of Lavender are aromatic. While its best life is spent outdoors during the Spring-Summer, you can bring it inside during the chillier months. To succeed as a scented houseplant, Lavender needs:

  • Well-draining soil: Add extra perlite to your favorite potting mix.

  • Bright Light: Lavender requires 4-8 hours of direct sunlight daily. Supplement with a grow-light if necessary.

  • Clay Pot: Terracotta is moisture-wicking, which means it will suck water out of the soil. This process helps your Lavender maintain even moisture levels.

  • Watering: You should rewater your plant when the first 1-2 inches of soil are dry.


Scented Pelargoniums (aka Geraniums)

These are different from your average flower-bed geraniums. Scented Geraniums are cultivated for their fragrant foliage and are often grown as houseplants. The best news is that they come in a wide array of smells: pine, peppermint, cinnamon, lemon, and rose are just a few. What type of care do these plants require?

  • Well-draining soil: Add extra perlite to your favorite potting mix.

  • Bright Light: A sunroom is a perfect location for this plant because it requires 12-14 hours of bright light daily. Supplement with a grow light if necessary.

  • Watering: You should rewater your plant in the morning when the first 1-2 inches of soil are dry. Underwatering will result in drooping leaves. Your plant is likely to recover after a heavy “drink,” but you may lose some of its foliage to yellowing.


Citrus Trees

You have your pick of citrus: key lime, lemon, lime, and clementine are just a few. To produce flowers and fruit, you’ll need to set your citrus tree outdoors during the Spring-Summer. But during the Fall-Winter, your tree will happily become a scented houseplant. Blossoms and leaves are both aromatic. How do you take care of it?

  • Well-draining soil: Add extra perlite to your favorite potting mix.

  • Bright Light: Citrus trees require 6-8 hours of direct sunlight daily. Supplement with a grow-light if necessary.

  • Watering: You should rewater your plant when the first half of the soil is dry. Citrus trees often have massive rootballs, so it can be challenging to gauge the moisture levels. Use a moisture meter or stick to a watering schedule (which usually isn’t recommended for houseplants) of once a month during the winter.

  • Flowers and fruit: Many citrus varieties can flower 2-3 times throughout the Spring-Fall when given the proper care. Chances are, you could be bringing your citrus plant indoors with fruit hanging from its limbs. Wait to pick the fruit until it’s fully developed.


Mint

Peppermint plants not only make wonderfully scented houseplants, but they’re edible too. If you’re not a fan of traditional mint flavors or would like to switch things up, there are many species to choose from. Like what? Chocolate, orange, and mojito varieties. Looking for some care tips?

  • Well-draining soil: Add extra perlite to your favorite potting mix.

  • Bright Light: Mint plants require the brightest light you can muster. Direct sunlight is preferable.

  • Watering: You should rewater your plant when the first ½ inch of soil is dry.

  • Cold Hardiness: Unlike most houseplants, Mint plants can tolerate chillier than comfortable temperatures. Why is this a perk? You can line your sunny but not-so-well-insulated windows with these plants.


Orchids

Orchids are a classic houseplant, and while not all have a vibrant scent, the Pansy and Corsage varieties do. An added perk? Orchids that are flowering in the winter months are likely to maintain that yearly routine (when cared for properly). This means that you can enjoy the smells and sights of Spring in the depths of winter!


Wondering how to take care of your Orchid? Sadly, Orchid care is not “one size fits all.” The specific care requirements depend mainly on the variety of Orchid you choose. So, make your selection and do your research!


Eucalyptus

As far as scented houseplants go, Eucalyptus is one of the most fragrant! This Australian native will brighten up any wintertime aesthetic. Plus, leaves and stems can be pruned, dried, and used for floral arrangements or medicinal purposes. To succeed indoors, Eucalyptus needs:

  • Well-draining soil: Add extra perlite to your favorite potting mix.

  • Bright Light: Full direct sun. A sunroom is ideal, or you can supplement it with a grow light.

  • Watering: Rewater when the top ⅓ of the soil is dry.


Paperwhites

While some legwork is required on your end, planting Paperwhite bulbs is an easy, quick project that produces a scented houseplant with daffodil-like blossoms in about six weeks. How do you do it?

  1. Pick a shallow, decorative bowl (3-4 inches deep).

  2. Fill the bowl with small, loose stones.

  3. Press the Paperwhite bulbs into the stones (but don’t bury them).

  4. Add just enough water to cover the bottom of the bulbs.

  5. Place the bowl in a dark room until you see green shoots emerging from the bulbs.

  6. Relocate your Paperwhites to a cool, sunny location. (A wintertime windowsill is perfect!)

  7. Enjoy your fragrant blooms.

  8. After the plants are exhausted (in about two weeks), throw them away and start over.



No matter which scented houseplant you choose, you’re guaranteed to get a mid-winter pick-me-up! Your home will smell lovely, and your cabin fever will (hopefully) be gone.


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